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Aptis for Teachers: Writing Test 1

Aptis Teachers Writing Test 1

Aptis for Teachers: Writing Test 1

In this post we’re looking at the Aptis for Teachers writing test.  As we explained in the Writing Overview, it’s the same in format to Aptis General, but different in content.  Like all the Aptis for Teachers components, the writing test relates to themes and scenarios that teachers come across every day.  So it could centre round a teachers’ conference, a training course, a school exchange trip, or something similar.

There are four parts to each Aptis writing test, and you have 50 minutes to do this component. All four parts of the test are based around the same theme. Remember that this exam is for A1-level students and above, so the first part of each of the tests is intended to be easy.  All the skills tests (Speaking, Listening, Writing, Reading) increase in difficulty as they go on.

We’re going to use the theme of attending a conference for our Sample Test.  We’ll start with a brief reminder of what each part entails, then give you the test questions.  Then we’ll show you a video explaining each part in more detail, and giving you sample answers at B2.

We strongly recommend you to do the test yourself before looking at the Aptis for Teachers writing test with sample answers. For this reason, we’re going to give you the blank exam paper first. Try to do the test within exam timing.

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Part One:  Writing at word-level

In the first part there are five questions. The task consists of replying to short messages from another member of the club or group you want to join. You only have to write one to five words for each response.  Suggested timing: up to 3 minutes.

You are going to a conference about teaching English in the classroom. You have 5 messages from another teacher who is attending the conference. Write short replies (1-5 words) to each message.

  1. Where’s your school?
  2. What do you like doing after work?
  3. What’s your favourite day of the week?
  4. What do you have for breakfast?
  5. How many students do you teach?

 

Tip: The most important aspect here is communication – it doesn’t matter if you make spelling or grammar mistakes.

 

Part Two:  Writing a short text

In the second part the task consists of writing some personal information on a form. They ask you one or two questions. You must write in complete sentences, and you have to write 20–30 wordsSuggested timing: up to 7 minutes.

Before you go to the conference, you have a form to complete. Tell us about your students and what subjects you teach. Use 20–30 words.

Tip: The most important aspects here are staying on-topic and using accurate grammar, spelling and punctuation. In other words, make sure you answer the question, and try not to make mistakes! Don’t go over the 30-word limit.

 

Part Three:  Three written responses

In the third part of the test you have to respond to three written questions from other members of the group. The style is informal; the context is writing on a social network-type website. You have to write 30-40 words per answer. Suggested timing: up to 10 minutes.

During the conference, you have to opportunity to chat to the other participants. Talk to them using sentences. Use 30-40 words for each answer.

  • Why did you choose to come to this conference?
  • What’s the most interesting talk that you’ve been to so far?
  • What’s the most difficult thing about teaching?

 

Tip: The most important aspects here are staying on-topic and using accurate grammar, spelling and punctuation. Using a variety of sentence structure and linking your sentences well is also important. Don’t go over the 40-word per answer limit.

 

Part Four:  Informal and formal emails

The final and most difficult part of the Aptis writing test consists of writing two emails in different registers. What does that mean? It means writing in both informal and formal styles.

First of all, you have to write a short informal email to a friend. You must write 40–50 wordsSuggested timing: up to 10 minutes.

Then you have to write a formal email of 120­–150 words to a person in authority. Both emails are on the same theme, but you must use different levels of formality.  Suggested timing: up to 20 minutes.

You see this message on the conference notice board:

Dear Delegates

We are writing to inform you that for reasons beyond our control, the closing plenary will take place in room 452 and not in the main hall as advertised. Unfortunately, this room only seats 80 people, with standing room at the back for another 20. This means that in order to get a seat, you will have to come early to queue.

Notes from the session will, of course, be made available online to those who can’t attend. We are sorry for this inconvenience and hope you understand.

The Organisers

  1. Write an email to your friend who is also attending the conference. Write about your feelings and what you think the organisers should do.  Write 40–50 words.
  2. Write an email to conference organisers. Write about your feelings and suggest a better solution to the problem.  Write 120-150 words.

 

Tip: The most important aspect here is showing you can write accurately in different registers. Try to use a wide variety of appropriate vocabulary, structures and linking words. Use paragraphs. Stay on-topic. Don’t go over the limits of 50 words in the informal email and 150 words in the formal email.

 

A summary of general points to remember:

  • Except in Part 1, keep an eye on your grammar, spelling and punctuation. Use connectors (link words) to make your writing coherent.
  • Stay on-topic – don’t just write generally about the subject. Make sure you address the questions, or you will lose marks on task fulfilment’.
  • The word count is important – you will lose marks on ‘task completion’ if you write too many or too few words. NOTE: You don’t have to count the words yourself, as there’s a word-counter on the screen to show you how much you’ve written.
  • You’ll see that the timings add up to the 50-minute total. However, you should always try to leave a few minutes free at the end of the test. This is so you can look through your work for any obvious mistakes. That’s why our suggested timings say up to X minutes. Ideally, aim for up to a minute less in each part.

 

When you’ve finished writing, check through your work. Look for:

  • spelling and punctuation mistakes
  • grammar mistakes (for example: tenses, 3rd person ‘s’ endings, wrong preposition)
  • correct use of paragraphs
  • correct word counts
 
Now watch John explaining the Aptis for Teachers writing test in more detail, including sample answers at B2.  He also gives you tips and ideas.  You can turn the subtitles on if you want – we’ve done them ourselves, so they’re correct!
 
You’ll find the script below the video.

Writing Test 1 with Sample B2 Answers

Part One

You are going to a conference about teaching English in the classroom. You have 5 messages from another teacher who is attending the conference. Write short replies (1-5 words) to each message.

  1. Where’s your school? In the city centre.
  2. What do you like doing after work? Watching films on Netflix.
  3. What’s your favourite day of the week? It has to be Friday.
  4. What do you have for breakfast? A bowl of cereal.
  5. How many students do you teach? Around 200 in total.

 

Part Two

Before you go to the conference, you have a form to complete. Use 20–30 words.  Tell us about your students and what subjects you teach.

My students range from ages 13 to 18 and come from a low socio-economic background. There are roughly 30 teenagers in each class. I’m responsible for teaching STEM subjects.

 

Part Three

During the conference, you have to opportunity to chat to the other participants. Talk to them using sentences. Use 30-40 words for each answer.

Why did you choose to come to this conference?

For a couple of reasons, really. Firstly, to learn some new classroom techniques and to share ideas of good practice with other teachers. Secondly, because I think it’s important to keep up-to-date with the latest methodology.

What’s the most interesting talk that you’ve been to so far?

It was on how to implement CLIL methodology when teaching maths. I had no idea about this before I attended the session, but now I feel much better prepared. It was also presented in a very dynamic way.

What’s the most difficult thing about teaching?

Some teenagers really don’t want to be at school, so they make life difficult for everybody around them. Not only that, but the classes are just too big. If the numbers were lower, teaching would be so much easier.

 

Part Four

You see this message on the conference notice board:

Dear Delegates

We are writing to inform you that for reasons beyond our control, the closing plenary will take place in room 452 and not in the main hall as advertised. Unfortunately, this room only seats 80 people, with standing room at the back for another 20. This means that in order to get a seat, you will have to come early to queue.

Notes from the session will, of course, be made available online to those who can’t attend. We are sorry for this inconvenience and hope you understand.

The Organisers

1. Write an email to your friend who is also attending the conference. Write about your feelings and what you think the organisers should do.  Write 40–50 words.

Hi Petra,

Have you heard that we won’t all fit in for the plenary? I think that’s a bit unfair, don’t you? Why can’t they just divide us into two groups and do the session twice? We’ve all paid the same, after all!

Let me know,

John

2. Write an email to conference organisers. Write about your feelings and suggest a better solution to the problem. Write 120-150 words.

Dear Sir/Madam,

I am writing in response to the announcement you have made about the closing plenary. While I understand that changing rooms is obviously unavoidable, I must say I feel you could find a more appropriate solution than ‘first come, first served’.

It is hardly fair that those who arrive last will be refused entry. Everyone has invested time and money in this conference, and deserves the same treatment. Furthermore, there may be some delegates who are unable to stand for that length of time. Not to mention that some people may not have seen the notice, and will be unaware of the need for arriving early.

Perhaps I could suggest that you divide the delegates into two groups and repeat the session? That way, nobody would miss out and a last-minute rush would be avoided.

Yours faithfully,

John Harrop

After watching the video

Don’t miss our Top Tips for passing the Writing Test!

You could also practise with the Aptis General Writing Test 1 and Test 2 on YouTube.  

Have you seen the Aptis For Teachers: Reading Test Part 1? You’ll find all four parts in our Guide to the Posts.

And check out the Reading Overview and Top Tips posts. 

12 thoughts on “Aptis for Teachers: Writing Test 1”

  1. Your sample test for writing is really helpful for everyone who wants to prepare for the exam. I really enjoy all types of the tests while doing them. I would like to thank you for giving a chance to practice tests. Also, I look forward to hearing from you new sample tests for us.

    1. Thanks for taking the time to leave a reply Vally – we’re so pleased that you’re finding the posts useful. Remember to come back and check in soon as we’re constantly adding new content.

  2. Hi everyone! I’m gonna take Aptis exam for the first time my listening is perfect but I have some doubt about others. So can you share some ideas that may help me in the exam

  3. Hi Chris
    It is very fruitful to learn the writings that you are sharing us. I have been studiying all your videos. They are so useful for the English teacher who want to pass Aptis exam.

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