Aptis for Teachers: Writing Test 2

Teachers Writing Test 2

Aptis for Teachers: Writing Test 2

Here’s the second Aptis for Teachers writing test with model answers.  You’ll find more details about the structure of each part of the test in Writing Test 1 and the Writing Overview. There are also tips on doing each task and a general summary of what you need to remember. So we’ll just give you a brief reminder here. There are four parts to the Aptis writing test, and you have 50 minutes to complete it. All four parts of the test are based around the same theme.

For this sample test we’ve used the theme of going on a teacher exchange visit. We’re going to give you the blank exam paper first, so you can try it yourself before looking at the writing test with model answers. Set a timer so that you get used to doing the test in exam conditions. We suggest allotting your time as follows:

3 minutes for Part One

7 minutes for Part Two

10 minutes for Part Three

10 minutes for the first task and 20 minutes for the second task in Part Four.

These are all maximum timings – the ideal would be to complete each task slightly more quickly. Try to leave yourself a few minutes at the end to read through your answers and check for spelling, punctuation and grammar mistakes. Remember to make sure you’ve used paragraphs and that you haven’t exceeded the word counts.

Aptis for Teachers: Writing Practice Test 2

Part One

You are going on a teacher exchange visit. You have 5 messages from a teacher at the exchange school. Write short replies (1-5 words) to each message. Suggested time: 3 minutes.

  1. Where do you work?
  2. What do you in your free time?
  3. Do you have any pets?
  4. What is your favourite subject?
  5. What type of music do you like?

 

Part Two

Before you go on the exchange visit, you have a form to complete. Use 20–30 words. Suggested time: 7 minutes.

Tell us why you want to take part in the exchange programme.

 

Part Three

Before you go on the exchange visit, you have to opportunity to chat online to teachers at the exchange school. Talk to them using sentences. Use 30-40 words for each answer. Suggested time: 10 minutes.

Tell us about your school.

What do you hope to learn on the exchange?

What do you like the most about your job?

 

Part Four

You receive this message from the agency that’s organising the exchange trip.

Dear Marge, Teresa and Donna

We are writing to inform you that there has been a slight change to your visit next week. The hotel where you are booked to stay has written to inform us that they can no longer offer individual rooms, only one shared family room. This is due to emergency renovation beyond their control. They have said that it’s a large room with an en-suite bathroom. We understand that this is not ideal, but unfortunately it is the only hotel in the village.

We hope that this won’t inconvenience you too much.

Regards,

EducAgency

 

Task 1

Write an email to your friend. Write about your feelings and what you think the organisers should to about this situation. Write 40–50 words. Suggested time: 10 minutes. 

Task 2

Write an email to the organisation Write about your feelings and what you think the organisers should to about this situation. Write 120-150 words. Suggested time: 20 minutes.

Once you’ve finished the practice test, watch this video. John explains the writing tasks in more detail and also gives you tips and ideas.  You can turn the subtitles on if you want. You’ll find the complete writing test with model answers below the video.

Writing Test with Model Answers at B2-level

Part One

You are going on a teacher exchange visit. You have 5 messages from a teacher at the exchange school. Write short replies (1-5 words) to each message. Suggested time: 3 minutes.

  1. Where do you work? Liverpool, in northwest England.
  2. What do you in your free time? I read and do gardening.
  3. Do you have any pets? Two budgies and a chinchilla.
  4. What is your favourite subject? I really love maths.
  5. What type of music do you like? I’m into death metal.

 

Part Two

Before you go on the exchange visit, you have a form to complete. Use 20–30 words. Suggested time: 7 minutes.

Tell us why you want to take part in the exchange program.

It’s an incredible opportunity to learn about how teachers in another country work. I think it’ll be fascinating! I’m really looking forward to practising my English too.

 

Part Three

Before you go on the exchange visit, you have to opportunity to chat online to teachers at the exchange school. Talk to them using sentences. Use 30-40 words for each answer. Suggested time: 10 minutes.

Tell us about your school.

It’s a comprehensive school in the suburbs of Liverpool. It was built in the 1960s and has around 700 students. It’s a great place to work as the staff are amazing and the head is really supportive.

What do you hope to learn on the exchange?

I think we can learn a lot by doing peer observation, so I’m keen on visiting other classrooms to watch how subjects are taught, especially maths. I’ve heard that your approach is quite different to ours.

What do you like the most about your job?

It’s extremely rewarding in terms of building up relationships. You can really get to know your students over the years, and as you often end up teaching their younger brothers and sisters too, you meet the whole family.

 

Part Four

You receive this message from the agency that’s organising the exchange trip.

Dear Marge, Teresa and Donna

We are writing to inform you that there has been a slight change to your visit next week. The hotel where you are booked to stay has written to inform us that they can no longer offer individual rooms, only one shared family room. This is due to emergency renovation beyond their control. They have said that it’s a large room with an en-suite bathroom. We understand that this is not ideal, but unfortunately it is the only hotel in the village.

We hope that this won’t inconvenience you too much.

Regards,

EducAgency

 

Task 1

Write an email to your friend. Write about your feelings and what you think the organisers should to about this situation. Write 40–50 words. Suggested time: 10 minutes. 

Hi Mally,

How are things with you? The exchange-trip organisers have just written to tell me I’ll have to share a room with Teresa and Donna. I’m not happy with that at all. Why can’t they put us in something like Airbnb?

Take care,

Marge

 

Task 2

Write an email to the organisation. Write about your feelings and what you think the organisers should to about this situation. Write 120-150 words. Suggested time: 20 minutes.

Dear EducAgency,

I am writing in response to the email about the change in accommodation. While I understand that the renovation is unavoidable and beyond your control, I am not at all satisfied with the suggested solution. Not only that, the trip starts next week, so you have left it extremely late to inform us.

Although sharing a room may be a good option for teenagers, we are three grown-up women and we are not prepared to do so.

I must say we feel sure you could find a more appropriate solution. Have you considered finding out whether there are people in the village who offer something like Airbnb? Failing that, perhaps there is a teacher at the school who would be happy to make some extra money by renting out a spare room.

We look forward to your swift reply.

Yours faithfully,

Marge Cardigan

Next steps

Make sure you’ve also done Aptis for Teachers: Writing Test 1.

Remember to read the Aptis Writing Test: Overview and Top Tips to Help You Pass the Aptis Writing Test.

You could also practise with the Aptis General Writing Test 1 and Test 2 on YouTube.  

You’ll find all four parts of our Aptis for Teachers Reading Tests in the Guide.

And check out the Reading Overview and Top Tips posts. 

4 thoughts on “Aptis for Teachers: Writing Test 2”

  1. It’s good to be able to hear the pronunciation on the videos, as some of the answers will also be useful for the speaking test.

  2. In the light of excessive number of tips and questions this chanel always attracts me. Thank you tutror for providing illuminating lessons.

    1. Hi Aysha, We’re so glad to hear that! As teachers we know how useful examples and advice can be. Are you a teacher too? Good luck with your studies! (By the way, just to help a little more, ‘excessive’ means too much or too many, so ‘high’ or ‘enormous’ would be better here.)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *